2nd PRIZE_RUNNER UP : In-Between/ 2º PREMIO

The concept of our proposal is based on a dialogue between volumes made of two drastically different materials (wood and concrete) and the empty space in the middle (void hosting gardens and vertical communication). Apart from generating interesting spaces with three different ambiances, this could be considered a metaphor for cemetery, being literally a place between two worlds – of dead and living. Our project recognizes them both as drastically different and yet at the same time seamlessly bonds them together within one structure by finding a place for utilities and public spaces apart from tombs. All this is concealed in carefully designed modular grid that sorts out space dedicated for each grave in an economic (in terms of being compact) and respectful manner that at the same time does not contradict neither Japanese traditions nor customs. The same cubic module is responsible for structural elements placement and interior/greenery design elements.

Skyscraper’s geometry is based on a spectacular prism with standout vertical proportions and strong presence in this part of Shinjuku district, making it visible from many points around the city so that it serves as a landmark and is easily noticeable.

Simple cuboid is split in the middle by irregular, ruled cut. In macro scale, this accounts for sculptural-like values of the proposal. In micro scale this operation generates stunning open spaces of vertical green gardens, plazas and parks with stunning views. The cut is also location of a seemingly suspended mid air, representative staircase twined around the void that joins together all the levels of both parts of the building with their respective courtyards.

Link a la noticia en Arch out loud

Link a la propuesta completa en Arch out loud

Nombre del proyecto
Propuesta “In-Between”
Emplazamiento
Tokio, Japón
Patrocinador
Arch out loud
País
Japón
Fecha
Octubre 2016
Arquitecto
Moisés Royo
Colaboradores
Carlos Orbea Martínez
Gonzalo García-Robledo
Piotr Panczyk

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